WHO THIS ARTICLE IS FOR?




                                           WHO THIS ARTICLE IS FOR?

This site is meant for PEOPLE SEEKING real hackers. If you're not serious about HIRING an elite hacker, then leave. Otherwise, look at the following list and ask yourself if you've ever been through one or more of these situations:

I want to hack servers and firewalls and program in code.

I think my significant other (girlfriend, boyfriend, husband, wife, fiancé) is cheating on me and I want to hack their Facebook or e-mail account to find out.

I'm not doing good in school and I want to change my grades.

I want to bypass my school's web filter and look at blocked web sites.

I want to hack web sites and not get caught by the F.B.I.

I want to crack someone's password.

If you have been in one or more of these situations, then this site is for you. I cover all of that and give you the resources you need to hire a real hacker that can do any of these things.






A man in Sweden says he will pay up to $2,000 to anyone who can break into his landlord’s website. A woman in California says she will pay $500 for someone to hack into her boyfriend’s Facebook and Gmail accounts to see if he is cheating on her.

The business of hacking is no longer just the domain of intelligence agencies, international criminal gangs, shadowy political operatives and disgruntled “hacktivists” taking aim at big targets. Rather, it is an increasingly personal enterprise.

The hacker culture is a subculture of individuals who enjoy the intellectual challenge of creatively overcoming limitations of software systems to achieve novel and clever outcomes. The act of engaging in activities (such as programming or other media in a spirit of playfulness and exploration is termed "hacking". However, the defining characteristic of a hacker is not the activities performed themselves (e.g. programming), but the manner in which it is done and whether it is something exciting and meaningful. Activities of playful cleverness can be said to have "hack value" and therefore the term "hacks" came about, with early examples including pranks at MIT done by students to demonstrate their technical aptitude and cleverness. Therefore, the hacker culture originally emerged in academia in the 1960s around the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)'s Tech Model Railroad Club (TMRC) and MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory.\

Richard Stallman explains about hackers who program:

What they had in common was mainly love of excellence and programming.
They wanted to make their programs that they used be as good as they could.

They also wanted to make them do neat things. They wanted to be able to do something in a more exciting way than anyone believed possible and show "Look how wonderful this is.

I bet you didn't believe this could be done."



Hackers from this subculture tend to emphatically differentiate themselves from what they pejoratively call "crackers"; those who are generally referred to by media and members of the general public using the term "hacker", and whose primary focus? be it to malign or for malevolent purposes?lies in exploiting weaknesses in computer security.



At a time when huge stealth attacks on companies like Sony Pictures, JPMorgan Chase and Home Depot attract attention, less noticed is a growing cottage industry of ordinary people hiring hackers for much smaller acts of espionage.

There are various websites, seeks to match hackers with people looking to gain access to email accounts, take down unflattering photos from a website or gain access to a company’s database. In less than 2 months of operation, over 500 hacking jobs have been put out to bid on the site, with hackers vying for the right to do the dirty work.

It is done anonymously, with the website’s operator collecting a fee on each completed assignment. The site offers to hold a customer’s payment in escrow until the task is completed.

In just the last few days, offers to hire hackers at prices ranging from $100 to $5,000 have come in from around the globe on different hacking websites like the dark web solutions, which opened for business in early November.

For instance, a bidder who claimed to be living in Australia would be willing to pay up to $2,000 to get a list of clients from a competitor’s database, according to a recent post by the bidder.

“I want the client lists from a competitors database. I want to know who their customers are, and how much they are charging them,” the bidder wrote.

Others posting job offers on the website were looking for hackers to scrub the Internet of embarrassing photos and stories, retrieve a lost password or change a school grade.

The rather matter-of-fact nature of the job postings shows just how commonplace low-profile hacking has become and the challenge such activity presents for law enforcement at a time when federal and state authorities are concerned about data security.

Hacking into individual email or social media accounts occurs on a fairly regular basis, according to computer security experts and law enforcement officials.




Still, the market for hackers, many of whom comply with the law and act more like online investigators, shows no signs of slowing. Many companies are hiring so-called ethical hackers to look for weaknesses in their networks.

David Olsen, a director of operations with dark web solutions, which is incorporated in Colorado, said he had seen increased demand from companies looking to make sure their employees are not obtaining sensitive information through hacking. He said in an email that companies were increasingly focused on an “insider threat” leading to a breach or unauthorized release of information.

On its website, darkweb solutions describes itself as a company of “certified ethical hackers” that works with customers to “secure your data, passwords and children’s safety.”


 You can mail darkwebssolutions@gmail.com
                       darkwebsolutions@hackermail.com

Hack with a style of touch with software that cannot be traced.

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